• Swimming Pool Paint, Coatings & Primers

Dura Seal Pool Paint: One-Coat Epoxy
Dura Seal Pool Paint
One-Coat Epoxy

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Aqua Seal Pool Paint: Acrylic Enamel
Aqua Seal Pool Paint
Acrylic Enamel

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SR Pro 7 Pool Paint: Synthetic Rubber Base
SR Pro 7 Pool Paint
Synthetic Rubber Base

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Smart Step Pool Paint: Conversion Coating
Smart Step Pool Paint
Conversion Coating

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Prime It! Pool Paint Epoxy Primer for Smooth Surfaces
Prime It! Pool Paint
Epoxy Primer for Smooth Surfaces

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Rough Prime Pool Paint: High Build Epoxy Primer
Rough Prime Pool Paint
High-Build Epoxy Primer

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  • Pool Deck Paint & Patio Sealers

Patio Perfect: Pool Patio & Deck Coating
Patio Perfect
Acrylic Pool Patio & Deck Coating

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A+ Clear Sealer - Matte: Water-Based Clear Acrylic Coating
A+ Clear Sealer - Matte
Water-Based Clear Acrylic Coating

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A+ Clear Sealer - Semi Gloss Water-Based Clear Acrylic Coating
A+ Clear Sealer - Semi Gloss
Water-Based Clear Acrylic Coating

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  • Pool Paint Maintenance Products

PrepWise: Pool Paint Preparation Solution
PrepWise
1-Step Clean & Etch Pool Paint Preparation Solution

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Pool Paint Application Kit: The Tools You Need to Paint Your Pool or Deck
Pool Paint Application Kit
The Tools You Need to Paint Your Pool or Deck

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Diving Board Resurfacing Kit: Diving Board Paint
Diving Board Resurfacing Kit
Help provide sure footing to worn diving boards

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  • What Pool Paint Do I Need to Use?

When it comes to researching options available for painting your pool, there is a whole world of choices to consider. Without properly understanding what kind of pool paint you’re in need of, you run the risk of creating more work for yourself. Smart Seal has a full line of different paint products for your pool and the surrounding areas, no matter the materials or visual look you want.

When painting pool surfaces, it’s important to first determine whether or not the pool has already been painted. If you’re trying to repaint or maintain a pool which has already been painted, it’s best to figure out what type of paint has been applied in the past. Not all paint types are compatible with one another but you can often send a sample of your pool’s existing paint to a manufacturer or local paint dealer to find out what was previously used on your pool. However, there are a couple of tests anyone can do at home to determine what the present paint is composed of:

  1. If a paint chip is submerged in denatured alcohol and it dissolves, it is most likely acrylic-based. If it doesn’t, move on to step two.

  2. Submerge a new paint chip into a combination of one part Xylol and three parts mineral spirits. If it dissolves after being rubbed together several times, then this is most likely a synthetic rubber-based paint. If it does not dissolve, try out step three.

  3. Take another new paint chip and this time submerge in nothing but Xylol. If it does not dissolve, then it is likely an epoxy style paint; if it does dissolve after being dipped in the Xylol, then it is probably paint containing chlorinated rubber.

While you can do some field testing to identify the previous layers of applied paint, it is highly recommended to have samples officially tested by a local paint retailer or manufacturer. Once you’ve determined which specific type of paint was applied to your pool in the past, modern paints are typically classified as either synthetic rubber, epoxy, acrylic, and water-based acrylic. It’s always best to use the same paint type as previously administered. For example, if a pool was previously painted with something that consisted of a synthetic rubber, applying a similar type of rubber-based pool paint would be the most ideal solution. In cases where a pool has not been painted yet — regardless of being concrete, fiberglass, plaster, or gunite — users can apply all of the above types of paint for their swimming pool. Although all can be used, it should be noted that certain types of paint are better than others.

  • Other Painting Considerations

  • Painting Surfaces: The first step when considering whether to apply new paint is by identifying a swimming pool’s material and the surface(s) which will have a coating applied. The reason being that certain surfaces respond better to certain paint types.
  • Prepping a Pool: After determining the surface materials to be painted, revisit the previous section to determine which type of paint you’ll likely want to use. From there, preparing a pool to be painted requires draining and allowing enough time for a pool to properly dry. Unfortunately, some materials take longer than others to dry. In some instances, concrete pools can take in excess of a week to remove any moisture before you can apply certain acrylic and epoxy type paints. Depending on local climate conditions, take necessary precautions in order to allow your pool to fully dry.
  • Spas, Pebble Surfaces: In most cases, spas, hot tubs, and pools with pebble/aggregate materials are not equipped to accept paints and acrylic coatings. In these situations, it’s best to address resurfacing in accordance with manufacturer recommendations.

 

Colors shown will slightly differ from actual paint. For a more accurate color representation, ask your retailer for a Smart Seal Color Guide.